Harvey MacKay

The best way to make a new connection is to have a common interest (the university) or a mutual friend that connects you. My client was still a bit reluctant. “Do you really want to talk to me?” He asked. I asked him to rethink his career in advertising at a time when someone who knew nothing called him to ask anything. How do you feel? Does it help? Often the caller, is flattered by the attention and is willing to help. Ten years ago a young man had been a student of mine 25 years before they called me to reconnect. I actually called to tell me what an impact my teaching had done in his life.

I was flattered and delighted to hear from him. The young man who was not called me for help at that time. Keeping in touch with your network, even when you do not have questions that makes it easier to reconnect when you need help or information. Those who would willingly help others to find many helping hands when they need help themselves. Make sure that the person being helped yourself! J Professors and teachers from their school days can be powerful sources of information also if you stay in touch with them. If you are currently in school, nurture those relationships.

If you are out of school is never too late to revive them. (My former student waited 25 years!) Building a strong network of people is important and can be fun. Start from the beginning and be systematic monitoring of people, information about them, and how often you contact them. However, be prepared to help those in your network too. Learn more at this site: Samsung. To build a thriving network of communications and the support must go both ways! Take Action: 1. Make a list of people you know and want to stay in touch. Choose someone who has not spoken in a while and make the connection. 2. Call your college or graduate school alumni office for names and phone numbers of people in a field being explored. Call one of the names on the list. 3. Find a way to track contacts. A spreadsheet or contact management software are two ways to deliver this information. 4.To keep track of your contacts’ personal information have a look at the 66 questions suggested by Harvey MacKay swim with the sharks without being eaten alive.