Max Beckmann Saw

HELENA CELDRN El Kunstmuseum Basel (Switzerland) exposes the little-known landscapes of the German painter Max Beckmann (1884-1950). Their innovative perspectives accounted for a renewal for the genre. Although always loyal to realism, the avant-garde and the psychological aftermath of World War I changed the trajectory of his work. His experiences in World War I walked away from the realistic painting. German Max Beckmann (1884-1950), famous for his emaciated self-portraits and his stormy pictures about the human condition, participated in the conflict as a doctor. On the way back he suffered nervous attacks and a transformation in his art, which turned into a mixture of nightmare, variegated triptychs and rupture of any logical perspective scenes.

Against the inclination of currents pictorial of early 20th century to eliminate traditional genres, Beckmann the dndio always: portraits, mythological scenes, still lifes, landscapes but it is usually classified as an Expressionist and was inevitably influenced by the movement, not the abstraction was identified with the avant-garde: autodefinia as the last great master. It was a traditional artistic sensibility, but with an inner world plunged into chaos. Seventy paintings that changed the modern landscape the Kunstmuseum of Basel (Switzerland) inaugurated Max Beckmann: Die Landschaften (landscapes) a sample with seventy paintings of this genre. The exhibition includes masterpieces of the author as Meeresstrand (seashore, 1935) or Der Hafen von Genua (the port of Genoa, 1927). In addition, gather work of various private collections that rarely are exposed in museums. It is an occasion to discover innovations that Beckmann contributed to the genre of landscape. Panoramic framed in Windows, curtains, parapets, columns and viewpoints distance in a novel and personal perspective the natural immensity of the grotesque and ugly civilized world. Source of the news: what Max Beckmann saw when he looked out the window